• Name: Selenium

  • Symbol: Se

  • Number of Energy Levels: 4

  • Electrons on the outer energy level: 6

  • Atomic Number: 34

  • Atomic Mass: 78.96 Amu

  • Protons / Electrons: 34

  • Neutrons: 45

  • Density: 4.79 g/cm3

  • Classification: Non-Metal

Top 17 interesting facts about Selenium

  • Selenium was discovered in 1817 by Jons Berzelius. Its name drives from the Greek word "selene" (which means Moon).
  • Selenium's melting point is at 217.0 C (490.15 K, 422.6 F) and its boiling point is at 684.9 C (958.05005 K, 1264.8201 F).
  • Selenium can rarely be found in its elemental state in nature.
  • Usually, selenium is a byproduct obtained during cooper production.
  • Selenium has six naturally occurring isotopes, five of them being stable: 74-Se, 76Se, 77-Se, 78-Se, 80-Se, and 82-Se.
  • Because selenium has many similarities with Tellurium (named for the Earth), Berzelius named the new element selenium (which is the name for the Moon).
  • Selenium occurs naturally is selenide-containing minerals (and other such minerals) but they are rare.
  • Selenium is usually found in sulfide ores, replacing a small amount of the sulfur.
  • It is said that the ocean water contains significant amounts of selenium.
  • Selenium is also found in many living organism and its role is the same as of sulfur.
  • Every year, about 2000 tones of selenium are produced.
  • The biggest producers of selenium are: Germany, Japan, the USA, and China.
  • Most of the selenium is used in metallurgy and glass production.
  • China consumes the largest part of all selenium produced in the world.
  • Selenium is used in alloys replacing the more toxic lead.
  • Selenium is also a component in solar cell production.
  • Tolerable intake amount of selenium is 400 micro-grams/day.