• Name: Thorium

  • Symbol: Th

  • Number of Energy Levels: 7

  • Electrons on the outer energy level: 2

  • Atomic Number: 90

  • Atomic Mass: 232.03 Amu

  • Protons / Electrons: 90

  • Neutrons: 142

  • Density: 11.72 g/cm3

  • Classification: Rare Earth

Top 17 interesting facts about Thorium

  • Thorium was discovered in 1828 by Morten Thrane Esmark but it was identified by Jons Berzelius. Its name derives from the name of the Scandinavian god of thunder, Thor.
  • Thorium's melting point is at 1750.0 C (2023.15 K, 3182.0 F) and its boiling point is at 4790.0 C (5063.15 K, 8654.0 F).
  • Thorium is a soft, paramagnetic, and radioactive element.
  • Thorium can be found in nature in usable quantities.
  • Thorium has a silvery color.
  • Thorium is a highly reactive metal.
  • Thorium is soft and ductile.
  • Thorium oxidizes in the air forming a black layer of oxide.
  • Thorium is at least three times more abundant than uranium in the Earth's crust.
  • Thorium has six naturally occurring isotopes, all of them unstable.
  • Thorium-232 isotope has a half-life of more than 14 billion years therefore it is considered relatively stable and it makes up almost all natural thorium.
  • Thorium's radioactive decay produces an important amount of heat in Earth's core.
  • Thorium's abundance is comparable to that of lead.
  • Thorium is found and produced mainly from monazite ores.
  • Thorium is used as a nuclear fuel replacing uranium.
  • There are about 100 micrograms of thorium in every human body.
  • A person ingests about three micrograms of thorium every day.